The Book

George the (Almost) Fearless Mouse

How George can help your child

George the (Almost) Fearless Mouse is a gentle, positive and rewarding picture book written to help children overcome a fear of the dark, while making life easier and less anxious for the many youngsters experiencing high sensitivity.

You can buy copies of the book here – Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

George is intended as the first in a series of books aimed at raising awareness of high sensitivity.  However, while there are books written specifically for the highly sensitive, George is the first book written for ALL children.

So why a book about the dark?  For two reasons.  A fear of the dark was what first alerted me to my daughter’s high sensitivity.  Her response (which was to be afraid of all dark spaces, including a toilet bowl, a missing ceiling tile or a dark wood) was far more extreme than any of her friends.

Professional guidance resulted in me discovering that I’d been doing everything wrong (but that the vast majority of parents did exactly the same).  Telling her that she was just being silly or that daddy would protect her were both fine examples of my incompetent parenting, which only served to exacerbate the problem.  However, even changing my ways didn’t have a positive impact and to fast forward to the end of the story, this led to the discovery of Elaine Aron’s the HSC.

When I made the decision to utilize the one skill I have (as a writer) to raise awareness of high sensitivity, I knew that I needed something all-inclusive.  I didn’t see value in the bombastic approach, sermonizing the plight of the HSC in a way that would be of no interest to those not directly affected.

It had been while seeking guidance in how to deal with Seraphina’s fear of the dark and later in managing her high sensitivity that I learned that the coping mechanisms for each were very similar.  George the (Almost) Fearless Mouse was consequently born, a book that helps to address a subject that affects all children; which simultaneously helps youngsters suffering from night time fears while gracefully introducing the term Highly Sensitive Child to the wider public.